<html><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><br><br><br><br><br>To read this Life of the Day complete with a picture of the subject,<br>visit <a href="http://www.oxforddnb.com/view/lotw/2010-03-27">http://www.oxforddnb.com/view/lotw/2010-03-27</a><br><br><br><br><font class="Apple-style-span" color="#FB0038">Royce, Sir &nbsp;(Frederick) Henry</font>, baronet &nbsp;(1863-1933), engineer and motor car designer, was born on 27&nbsp;March 1863 at Alwalton, near Peterborough, youngest of the two boys and three girls of James Royce (1830-1872), flour miller, and his wife, Mary (d. 1904), third daughter of Benjamin King, farmer, of Edwin's&nbsp;Hall, Essex. When he was four his father took his two sons to London, intent upon running a metropolitan&nbsp;flour mill. Financial trouble followed and the young Royce became a W. H. Smith newspaper boy, first at&nbsp;Clapham and then Bishopsgate. When he was nine his father died, leaving under 20. Henry's schooling&nbsp;lapsed into irregularity and for a time he was a Post Office telegraph boy in Mayfair.<br><br>When Royce was fourteen a kindly aunt paid 20 per annum for him to be apprenticed in the Great Northern&nbsp;Railway Company's locomotive works in Peterborough. After three years his aunt's funds ran out but the&nbsp;enthusiasm and skill of a railway workshop craftsman, with whom he boarded and who taught him much about&nbsp;the arts of fitting and filing, had given Royce a fascination with engineering which lasted all his life.&nbsp;He tramped in search of work and found it with a machine tool firm in Leeds at 11s. for a 54-hour week,&nbsp;but soon decided that London held better prospects. In 1882 he became a tester with the London Electric&nbsp;Light and Power Company, which was installing electric arc and incandescent lighting in London's streets.&nbsp;Simultaneously he attended evening classes run by the City and Guilds Institute and others at Quintin&nbsp;Hogg's Polytechnic Day School in Regent Street. He sufficiently impressed his employers for them to&nbsp;appoint him chief electrical engineer of a subsidiary, the Lancashire Maxim and Western Electric Company,&nbsp;set up to introduce electric lighting to Liverpool. Royce worked on theatre lighting until, months later,&nbsp;the company went into liquidation and he was thrown onto his own resources once more.<br><br>Meanwhile Royce's Liverpool work had introduced him to Ernest Albert Claremont (d. 1921), a young man&nbsp;with 50 capital to add to Royce's 25, and some electrical experience. In 1884 they formed F. H. Royce &amp;&nbsp;Co., manufacturers of electric bell sets, lampholders, switches, fuses, and registering instruments, at&nbsp;Cooke Street, Manchester. Royce designed a drum-wound armature for a dynamo that had the distinct&nbsp;advantage of sparkless commutation in generating direct current. These dynamos were widely used in&nbsp;lighting cotton mills, factories, and ships and gained a strong reputation for reliability and longevity,&nbsp;engineering characteristics to which Royce gave high priority. The partnership was strengthened by ties&nbsp;of kinship and an additional 1500 capital on 16 March 1893 when Royce and Claremont married two sisters,&nbsp;daughters of Alfred Punt, a licensed victualler of London. With his wife, Minnie Grace (d. 1936), Royce&nbsp;set up home in Knutsford, in a house with a fine garden of which Royce, a dedicated rose and fruit tree&nbsp;grower all his life, was very proud. Shortly afterwards he brought his mother from London to live there.<br><br>In 1894 the partners converted their business into a limited company, Royce Ltd, bringing a friend with&nbsp;capital into the firm and appointing a young cashier and accountant, John De Looze, company secretary. De&nbsp;Looze freed Royce from the minutiae of paperwork so that he could concentrate on new technical ideas.&nbsp;Among these were electric cranes and motors for lock gates. Royce took out an early patent for a governor&nbsp;to control the downward speed of the crane arm, a project prompted by his horror of accidents. Between&nbsp;October 1897 and February 1899 the value of the firm's orders rose from 6000 to 20,000. The directors&nbsp;increased the company's capital to 30,000 to finance an expansion of productive capacity. Then came&nbsp;setbacks. The South African War checked domestic investment. In his specialist market, imports of cheaper&nbsp;cranes from Germany and the USA (many incorporating Royce's modifications) cut into sales. Royce refused&nbsp;to reduce the quality of his products in order to make his prices more competitive. For several years the&nbsp;company's financial results deteriorated. At the same time, Royce's interest was shifting from cranes to&nbsp;road vehicles, a cause of some anxiety for his colleagues.<br><br>When Royce bought a second-hand 10 hp Decauville, his first motor car, early in 1903 (having previously&nbsp;owned a De Dion-Bouton quadricycle), French manufacturers-enthusiasts operating in scattered workshops-dominated the infant car industry. American models were appearing but Royce regarded their engineering as&nbsp;primitive. Initially approving the design but not the engineering of the Decauville, Royce set out to&nbsp;rebuild it in his spare time. He ended up redesigning it and in autumn 1903 announced to his associates&nbsp;that he intended to build his own motor car. The two-cylinder 10 hp model emerged from the Cooke Street&nbsp;works on 1 April 1904 after months of overtime in which components were ruthlessly tested by multifarious&nbsp;experiments. Royce made most of it himself, aided by two apprentices, T. S. Haldenby and Eric Platford,&nbsp;and a toolmaker, Arthur Wormald, recruited from the Westinghouse works in Trafford Park. Three examples&nbsp;of this model were built. In the first months they tended to break down frequently but Royce, furiously&nbsp;insisting on high standards all round, persisted with his improvising, innovating, testing, and fitting&nbsp;so that, for their day, they became unusually reliable. Claremont bought one. A newcomer to the Royce&nbsp;board, Henry Edmunds, who was also a member of the Automobile Club committee, saw it and sent a&nbsp;photograph and specifications to his friend, Charles Stewart Rolls, who with Claude Goodman Johnson then&nbsp;ran an agency for French cars in London's West End. In the first week of May 1904 Rolls (who had&nbsp;previously approached William Weir (1877-1959) to supply a British-built car) and Edmunds went to&nbsp;Manchester, Royce having refused to go to London. Rolls was so impressed by the car that he agreed with&nbsp;Royce to become his sole agent and in this manner the famous partnership, echoing that of S. F. Edge and&nbsp;Montague Napier, began.<br><br>While Rolls, aristocratic and flamboyant, advertised Royce's cars in a series of reliability trials and&nbsp;races during 1904-6, ably understudied by Johnson, who organized sales, Royce concentrated on production.&nbsp;At first he manufactured a variety of models based on four chassis of 10, 15, 20, and 30 hp, the most&nbsp;successful being the four-cylinder 20 hp Grey Ghost. When Rolls-Royce Ltd was formed on 15 March 1906,&nbsp;with Claremont as chairman (as he remained until his death), Royce became chief engineer and works&nbsp;director with a salary of 1250 and 4 per cent of the profits above 10,000; he was the most highly paid&nbsp;man in the firm. After difficulties in raising capital, in December 1906 Johnson, the managing director,&nbsp;decided that the best way to secure a market share and cut costs would be to standardize the production&nbsp;of a very superior motor car. Royce set to work and designed the 40/50 hp Silver Ghost, 'his greatest&nbsp;achievement' &nbsp;(Lloyd, 1.22), which remained in production, substantially unchanged, from 1907 until 1925,&nbsp;when it gave way to Phantoms and Wraiths. Demand, which for Royce's cars was always ahead of supply, was&nbsp;strong for the Silver Ghost: 2813 were produced between 1907 and 1916, and between 1919 and 1925, 3360,&nbsp;the price rising from 985 to 1450 as a result of wartime inflation.<br><br>To cope with demand for the Silver Ghost, in June 1908 the motor section of the firm was separated from&nbsp;Cooke Street, Manchester, and transferred to Derby. By this time Royce, so long oblivious to the&nbsp;discipline of the balance sheet, was well recognized by the company's board as a poor production engineer&nbsp;but a brilliant designer. When he fell seriously ill in September 1908, his health having suffered from&nbsp;four years of incessant work, Johnson persuaded him to work in a drawing office at home with the&nbsp;assistance of a team of draughtsmen. News of Rolls's death in 1910 triggered a breakdown in Royce's&nbsp;health and in 1911 he underwent a major operation. Johnson, who realized that Royce's talents were the&nbsp;firm's greatest asset, persuaded him to live in a villa in the south of France with a drawing office and&nbsp;a personal staff of eight in adjacent premises. This unusual (for that time) separation of design and&nbsp;production lasted for the remainder of Royce's career: he divided his time between his homes at St&nbsp;Margaret's Bay, Kent (to which he moved in 1912) or West Wittering in Sussex (to which he moved during&nbsp;the First World War) in summer, and the villa at Le Canadel on the French riviera in winter, and never&nbsp;again came within a hundred miles of Derby. He nevertheless continued to control the main designs,&nbsp;keeping in close contact with experiments and other activities for another twenty years. In motor car&nbsp;design the original features of his work were the silent cam form of the valve-gear, the friction-damped&nbsp;slipper flywheel and spring drive for the timing gears, his battery ignition, the Royce expanding&nbsp;carburettor, and the wear-proof steering.<br><br>Although Rolls had often pressed him to design an aero-engine, he took no practical interest in the&nbsp;matter until the outbreak of war in 1914. Then he was persuaded by the sight of an airship struggling&nbsp;across the channel to modify the Silver Ghost engine for use in aeroplanes. After investigating various&nbsp;types of air-cooled engine, he at length characteristically made up his mind not to deviate from liquid&nbsp;cooling. Starting from a 12-cylinder V engine, he produced the 200 hp Eagle for the Admiralty early in&nbsp;1915. This was one of two aero-engines that were neither a technical nor a production failure during the&nbsp;war (the other was the Hispano-Suiza). Some 6100 were ordered and it played an important part in the war.&nbsp;The Eagle was followed by the Falcon (2175 ordered), the Hawk in 1915, and later the Condor. Eagle&nbsp;engines powered the Vickers Vimy bomber which took Alcock and Brown on the first west-to-east crossing of&nbsp;the Atlantic in 1919. At Royce's instigation the company entered the Schneider Trophy competitions in&nbsp;1929. With Ernest Walter Hives in charge of development, Royce modified the 850 hp Kestrel engine (which&nbsp;he designed in 1925) into the 'R' engine. Installed in the Supermarine S6 seaplane designed by R. J.&nbsp;Mitchell, it won the trophy. Further design work by Royce and metallurgical research at Derby improved&nbsp;the engine again and allowed Britain to win and keep the Schneider Trophy in 1931 (with a world speed&nbsp;record at 408 m.p.h.). Out of the experience gained from transatlantic and Schneider competitions, Royce&nbsp;laid down the prototype for the Merlin, a twelve-cylinder V engine, 'an exact scale-up of the Kestrel'&nbsp;&nbsp;(Lloyd, 2.160), which powered Spitfires and Hurricanes in the Second World War. Royce remained jealous of&nbsp;his position to the last. When the firm acquired Bentley Motors in 1931 he harshly subordinated W. O.&nbsp;Bentley, a rival designer and engineer, to the position of sales assistant in the Rolls-Royce London&nbsp;showroom.<br><br>Royce had only two directorships throughout his career, at Royce Ltd of Manchester and Rolls-Royce Ltd of&nbsp;Derby. He was a member of the institutions of mechanical, electrical, and aeronautical engineers. He was&nbsp;appointed OBE in 1918 and created a baronet in 1930. There were no children from his marriage. Royce died&nbsp;at Elmstead, his West Wittering home, on 22 April 1933. He was survived by his wife.<br><br>David J. Jeremy&nbsp;<br><br>Sources &nbsp;I. Lloyd, Rolls-Royce, 1-2 (1978) + H. Nockolds, The magic of a name, 2nd edn (1950) + M.&nbsp;Pemberton, The life of Sir Henry Royce: with some chapters from the stories of the late Charles S. Rolls&nbsp;and Claude Johnson (1934) + D. J. Jeremy, 'Royce, Sir Frederick Henry', DBB + A. Bird and I. Hallows, The&nbsp;Rolls-Royce motor car and the Bentleys built by Rolls-Royce, 4th revised edn (1975) + DNB<br>Archives Inst. CE + Institution of Mechanical Engineers, London, sketches relating to automobile brakes +&nbsp;Rolls-Royce Enthusiasts' Club, Northamptonshire, technical corresp. and papers<br>Likenesses &nbsp;F. D. Wood, bronze statue, 1922, Rolls-Royce Ltd, Derby  W. McMillan, bust, 1934, Rolls-Royce Ltd, Derby  P. North, photograph, Royal Aeronautical Society, London [see illus.]  portrait,&nbsp;repro. in Engineering (28 April 1933)  portrait, repro. in Engineer (28 April 1933)<br>Wealth at death &nbsp;112,598 8s. 11d.: probate, 6 June 1933, CGPLA Eng. &amp; Wales<br><br><br></body></html>