<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN">
<HTML><HEAD>
<META http-equiv=Content-Type content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1">
<META content="MSHTML 6.00.5730.13" name=GENERATOR>
<STYLE></STYLE>
</HEAD>
<BODY bgColor=#ffffff>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>Colin,</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>In my last I failed to say I haven't a clue where 
the "Lorne" in Lorne Sausage comes from.</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV align=justify><FONT face=Arial size=2>On the blueprinted engine subject, 
I'd guess whoever started it thinks assembling an engine to a drawing, as 
opposed to sticking a bit on as it goes past on an assembly line,&nbsp;confers 
benefits on it.&nbsp;Maybe so, but they&nbsp;confuse the ancient and long 
obsolete art of blueprinting with more&nbsp;modern usage. I started my 
engineering&nbsp;apprenticeship with Kincaid&nbsp;in 1949, and the only 
blueprint I ever saw was a few years later&nbsp;buried in Kincaid's 
archive.&nbsp; This was dug out in connection with a repair job to some 
old&nbsp;engine.&nbsp; They still flash "blueprints" in poorly researched films, 
the kind where the "secret plans" of the entire submarine/spacecraft/dastardly 
plot are contained in a rolled up sheet of paper about A2 size with not a trace 
of blue on it.&nbsp; When I told my journeyman in my 5th year&nbsp;I was moving 
to the DO, he said, "It's a dead end job - we don't need drawings."&nbsp; It was 
cynicism, the old "oil and water" divide, but it was true as far as engine 
assembly went - they were only consulted when all else failed.</FONT></DIV>
<DIV align=justify><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV align=justify><FONT face=Arial size=2>Hugh.</FONT></DIV></BODY></HTML>